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Upgrading Raspbian Stretch to Raspbian Buster

In this blog I want to note down in the shortest way possible how to upgrade your Raspberry Pi from Raspbian Stretch to Raspbian Buster. First check your current version of Raspbian is Raspbian Stre

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Improved graceful shutdown webserver

In a previous blogpost I wrote how to create a Webserver in Go with graceful shutdown. This time I want to show you a more improved version which you can utilize better in your projects as it can be used as a drop in server.go file in your project where I also make use of some popular high performing libraries.

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Go client for Elasticsearch using Docker

In this blog post I would like to cover the recently released Elasticsearch 7.0-rc1 Go client for Elasticsearch. In this blogpost I want to show you a small example with a simple Docker setup using to build a Elasticsearch cluster.

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Go webserver with gracefull shutdown

In this blogpost I want to show you how you can make a http webserver in Go with gracefull shutdown. Using this approach you allow the server to clean up some resources before it actually shuts down. Think about finishing a database transaction or some other long operation. We will be using the things we learned in my blogpost on concurency. So expect to see channels and go routines as part of the solution.

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Go interfaces and type assertions

In this blog I would like to zoom in on Interfaces and type assertions in Go. Compared to language like c# and Java implementing interfaces works slightly different. In the remainder of this blog I want to give you a bit of theory and practical usecases. In case this is your first time working with Go you might want to check out this blog which shows you how to setup your development environment including a small hello world.

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Concurrency in Go

A reason to choose Go over other programming languages could be to have the need for building software which requires concurrency. Go is built with concurrency in mind. You can achieve concurrency in

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The use of defer in Go

In my previous blog post I have covered how to setup your development environment for Golang including a simple hello world. In case this is your first Go project please have a look on this blog post

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Start on your first Golang project

A couple of months ago I started to do some coding in Go a.k.a Golang. Not only because they have an awesome logo ;-). My main reason was because I wanted to have something running as bare metal as possible on my Raspberry Pi and I wanted to have it available for different platforms to be easy to install. Some other reasons are the ease of creating async code by using Go in front of your methods and the unique approach of channels to sync between go routines (threads). I have been reading a lot about Go since it was released in 2012, now it was time to really get my hands dirty and try it for myself. Curious, continue reading…

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Upgrade Raspbian Jessie to RaspbianStretch

Very recently I have upgraded my Raspberry 3 to the new Raspbian OS, code named “Stretch”. Due to some security issues in the chipset of the Raspberry Pi 3 and Raspberry zero, I decided to upgrade min

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Jasmine vs. Mocha

In this blog post I want to highlight the similarities and the differences between Jasmine and Mocha. In this comparison I will focus on the latest versions of both libraries. As of this writing Jasm

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Using Gulp.js to check your code quality

In this blog post I want to show you how you can use Gulp.js to automate some tasks to check the quality of your code. Before we deep dive into the subject and the coding examples I first want togive you a short introduction on what Gulp.js actually is. So if you already know what Gulp.js is about you can move on to the next chapter. Easy to useBy preferring code over configuration, gulp keeps things simple and makes complex tasks manageable.EfficientUsing the power of node streams, gulp gives you fast builds that don’t write intermediary files to disk.Previous statements are quoted from the Gulp.js homepage. Gulp.js is just like Grunt.js a task runner build on Node.js aka io.js. Where you define your tasks in Grunt.js in a configuration based style, you will be defining your tasks in Gulp.js more in a code based style. For both task runner there is a wide variety of plugins available. So what is the real power of Gulp.js? In my opinion that is the utilization of the Node.js streams, which makes Gulp.js a very fast and memory efficient task runner. The difference between Gulp.js and Grunt.js can especially be noticed when working on larger projects, with huge amounts of files. In many cases developers are limiting the usage of both task runners to only their javascript projects. As I showed you last time Grunt.js can also be used to automate some of your .Net/c# tasks I want to show you today you can also use it on php projects. So here is my call for action. Stop limiting yourself and try to apply it on any project you’re working on, no matter the language!